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Impact of UCORLA Phase 4

Embedding Culture and Creativity in the Curriculum

1st April 2010 - 31st July 2010

The key aims of UCORLA projects were:

  • To embed cultural and creative activities into curriculum planning
  • To enable children to draw upon their knowledge of culture to improve their work
  • To give teachers more flexibility in their use of curriculum time
  • To implement opportunities for more creative teaching and learning
  • To engage cultural partners in supporting the delivery of the curriculum

Moreover, the UCORLA projects aimed to impact on the children’s level of attainment in both their writing in the Literacy lesson and in their cross-curricular work. They also aimed to impact on the children’s attitude to learning through providing them with access to both cultural and creative opportunities that linked to a specific topic of work with the support of a range of cultural partners.

 

  • Seven UCORLA projects have taken place in the summer term involving 316 children and young people, 11 school staff, 23 creative and cultural practitioners and over 100 family members who viewed the outcomes of the projects. The projects that took place were at:

    • Bowness C.P. School in Reception/Year 1 based on the theme of Dinosaurs;
    • Harwood Meadows C.P. School in Year 5 based on the theme of Cultural Change in Britain;
    • Haslam Park C.P. School in Year 6 based on the theme of Treasure Island;
    • High Lawn C.P. School in Year 1 based on the theme of The Seaside;
    • Ladybridge C.P. School in Year 1 based on the theme of The Seaside;
    • Oxford Grove C.P. School in Year 6 based on the theme of Robots;
    • The Young Mums’ Unit (KS4) based on the theme of Culture and Creativity.
  • The children have accessed at least 2 hours of culture and creativity a week during curriculum time. In addition, some children, spurred on by the access to culture and creativity that taking part in the UCORLA project had given them, have accessed cultural and creative opportunities in their own time.

    • 6% of the children who were targeted made 3 sub-levels’ of progress in their writing over the course of the project
    • 22% of the children who were targeted made 2 sub-levels’ of progress in their writing over the course of the project
    • 61% of the children who were targeted made 1 sub-level of progress in their writing over the course of the project
    • The project had a positive effect on the speaking and listening skills for 83% of the children.
    • The project had a positive effect on the attitude to learning for 94% of the children.
    • The project had a positive effect on the attitude to writing for 87% of the children.
    • The project had a positive effect on the attitude to writing for 86% of the children.
    • The project had a positive effect on the attitude to topic-based work for 98% of the children.

    The greatest impact from the project has been on the teachers’ understanding and knowledge of the cultural and creative opportunities provided by the cultural partners.  The teachers acknowledged that such experiences that were embedded into the curriculum enthused and inspired the children thus improving both their standard of work and their attitude to learning. In addition, the increased use of cross-curricular links in order to teach the topic ensured that the children had a more in depth knowledge of the topic and could therefore draw upon their knowledge to improve their work.